Dating a more educated woman

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They’d think we were argumentative, pushy, feminazis.

Really, we’re traditional in a lot of ways and are afraid of being judged negatively like that.” Given this prevalent conventional wisdom, it perhaps comes as no surprise that the romantic lives of accomplished women make front-page headlines only to tout bad news.

And if a woman makes a lot of money, men will be intimidated.

Conservative and liberal pundits alike mythologized the failure of feminism and the “waste” of these talented women who were searching for soul mates.

Instead, you hear about the single women who want to be married, as if that’s the only story.” Kim’s own observations, however, are different: “It’s a misconception that smart women don’t get married. And most of them have gotten graduate degrees themselves.” But Angela, 31, added, “Getting those degrees delays the process. And that’s when [women] freak out.” The deluge of dire findings about these women’s chances at love don’t help, either.

It’s dated.” Star and Angela agreed that the media are on the wrong track: “The men I’ve dated my career ambition,” said Star. In the years between Sylvia Ann Hewlett’s research and Maureen Dowd’s best-seller, two depressing studies garnered national attention.

When she was 35 and single, Julia, a lawyer in New York City, would play a game when she went to bars: “I told some guys I was an attorney and they ran away from me, and then other guys that I was a secretary at a law firm and at least for the short term they seemed more interested,” she said.

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“Too Smart to Marry” read the headline in the a few months later.The purported “news” was never good: Smart women are less likely to marry.Successful men are romantically interested only in their secretaries.How odd, then, to find out now that being a maid would have enhanced my chances with men.” These two books have had a profound effect on the way young, career-oriented women perceive their relationships. “I got that Maureen Dowd piece emailed to me by tons of people, including my mom, who wrote a header saying something like, ‘According to this, you’re never getting married.’ Someone in the office emailed me as well.Carolyn, 36, had recently ended a four-year relationship when the bad news books and articles began to garner large-scale media attention. It was just amazing how one single article can have so much resonance,” said Jill, 28, who works at a political nonprofit organization.

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